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Putin's Postbox
(Englisch)
Marcel Beyer

15,00 €

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Produktbeschreibung

Süddeutsche Zeitung sagt:

"In the geographical movement eastwards, the decades after 1989 take shape in a wealth of acoustic, visual and atmospheric perceptions: fonts, posters, buildings, modes of transport are witnesses as important as the people themselves."

Literarische Welt sagt:

"Reading Beyer, you begin to look more closely at the things around you and to be more patient in trusting your own associations and digressions."

AUTOR: Marcel Beyer

Marcel Beyer, born in Tailfingen/Württemberg in 1965, grew up in Kiel and Neuss. He studied German and English literature in Siegen, writing an MA thesis on the poet Friederike Mayröcker in 1992. A poet, essayist and novelist, he has also translated poetry by Gertrude Stein and Michael Hofmann. Marcel Beyer has received numerous awards including Germany´s most prestigious, the Georg Büchner Prize. He has lived in Dresden since 1996.

UEBERSETZUNG: Katy Derbyshire

Born in London and based in Berlin for more than twenty years, Katy Derbyshire translates contemporary German writers. Her published work includes books by Clemens Meyer, Christa Wolf, Heike Geissler and Olga Grjasnowa.
Eight essays on literature, language, art, Europe and life from one of Germany´s most revered living writers.After a visit to Putin´s old postbox, the reader is taken to Dresden and Brixton, Gdansk and Minsk, diverted to birds, bees, stray cats and pet dogs, confronted with Stasi and KGB, Proust and Jah Shaka, puzzled by overcoats and anoraks, Francis Bacon and Vermeer, and lost (then found) in service stations and memorial centres. Throughout, Marcel Beyer forges unexpected links and makes unpredictable leaps."I work from the margins, partly very literally as I build my sentences, for instance when I start with the name of a colour rather than a noun, to explore how the sentence might be steered from there to a subject. In my reading, I am drawn to the outliers or, as malicious claims would have it, to the obscure. Central books: that is, those everyone can agree on, have never much interested me. I am rarely tempted to explore the centre of my world in writing, and even if I did want to encroach upon a centre, I would have to choose a path from the outside. But outside, too, one advances to the heart of things.”Inspired by the great W. G. Sebald, Beyer´s playful literary investigations wend through the high points and horrors of Europe´s artistic history, towards a profoundly personal conclusion.
Eight essays on literature, language, art, Europe and life from one of Germany's most revered living writers.

After a visit to Putin's old postbox, the reader is taken to Dresden and Brixton, Gdansk and Minsk, diverted to birds, bees, stray cats and pet dogs, confronted with Stasi and KGB, Proust and Jah Shaka, puzzled by overcoats and anoraks, Francis Bacon and Vermeer, and lost (then found) in service stations and memorial centres. Throughout, Marcel Beyer forges unexpected links and makes unpredictable leaps.

"I work from the margins, partly very literally as I build my sentences, for instance when I start with the name of a colour rather than a noun, to explore how the sentence might be steered from there to a subject. In my reading, I am drawn to the outliers or, as malicious claims would have it, to the obscure. Central books: that is, those everyone can agree on, have never much interested me. I am rarely tempted to explore the centre of my world in writing, and even if I did want to encroach upon a centre, I would have to choose a path from the outside. But outside, too, one advances to the heart of things."

Inspired by the great W. G. Sebald, Beyer's playful literary investigations wend through the high points and horrors of Europe's artistic history, towards a profoundly personal conclusion.
"In the geographical movement eastwards, the decades after 1989 take shape in a wealth of acoustic, visual and atmospheric perceptions: fonts, posters, buildings, modes of transport are witnesses as important as the people themselves."
Süddeutsche Zeitung

"Reading Beyer, you begin to look more closely at the things around you and to be more patient in trusting your own associations and digressions."
Literarische Welt
Beyer, MarcelMarcel Beyer, born in Tailfingen/Württemberg in 1965, grew up in Kiel and Neuss. He studied German and English literature in Siegen, writing an MA thesis on the poet Friederike Mayröcker in 1992. A poet, essayist and novelist, he has also translated poetry by Gertrude Stein and Michael Hofmann. Marcel Beyer has received numerous awards including Germany's most prestigious, the Georg Büchner Prize. He has lived in Dresden since 1996. Derbyshire, KatyBorn in London and based in Berlin for more than twenty years, Katy Derbyshire translates contemporary German writers. Her published work includes books by Clemens Meyer, Christa Wolf, Heike Geissler and Olga Grjasnowa.

Über den Autor

Marcel Beyer, born in Tailfingen/Württemberg in 1965, grew up in Kiel and Neuss. He studied German and English literature in Siegen, writing an MA thesis on the poet Friederike Mayröcker in 1992. A poet, essayist and novelist, he has also translated poetry by Gertrude Stein and Michael Hofmann. Marcel Beyer has received numerous awards including Germany's most prestigious, the Georg Büchner Prize. He has lived in Dresden since 1996.

Born in London and based in Berlin for more than twenty years, Katy Derbyshire translates contemporary German writers. Her published work includes books by Clemens Meyer, Christa Wolf, Heike Geissler and Olga Grjasnowa.


Klappentext

Eight essays on literature, language, art, Europe and life from one of Germany's most revered living writers.nnAfter a visit to Putin's old postbox, the reader is taken to Dresden and Brixton, Gdansk and Minsk, diverted to birds, bees, stray cats and pet dogs, confronted with Stasi and KGB, Proust and Jah Shaka, puzzled by overcoats and anoraks, Francis Bacon and Vermeer, and lost (then found) in service stations and memorial centres. Throughout, Marcel Beyer forges unexpected links and makes unpredictable leaps.nn"I work from the margins, partly very literally as I build my sentences, for instance when I start with the name of a colour rather than a noun, to explore how the sentence might be steered from there to a subject. In my reading, I am drawn to the outliers or, as malicious claims would have it, to the obscure. Central books: that is, those everyone can agree on, have never much interested me. I am rarely tempted to explore the centre of my world in writing, and even if I did want to encroach upon a centre, I would have to choose a path from the outside. But outside, too, one advances to the heart of things."nnInspired by the great W. G. Sebald, Beyer's playful literary investigations wend through the high points and horrors of Europe's artistic history, towards a profoundly personal conclusion.



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